Friday, 28 February 2020

A Merchant's Daughter by Arabella Sheen EXCERPT 4




A Merchant’s Daughter

Arabella Sheen


A merchant’s daughter and a destitute nobleman. Can a marriage of convenience solve their problems?
Miss Emma Brentry is happy with life, but she feels the time has come to marry. Her father, a wealthy glass merchant, has expectations of grandchildren, and Emma doesn’t wish to disappoint him. Reluctantly, and somewhat halfheartedly, she begins the search for a husband.
Mr. Aaron Trent, a gentleman of noble birth, returns to England fresh from the Napoleonic war with a scar and limp to prove it. During his absence, his estate, Windhurst Hall, has been pledged by his cousin at the gaming tables. He is now in search of the necessary funds with which to buy back his home.
Traveling to Bath, Emma finds herself stranded on the road and is compelled to stay the night at The Stag and Hounds posting inn. She encounters Aaron, an attentive, handsome stranger, who offers her some much-needed assistance. Instant attraction is felt by both, and as dusk falls, Emma makes Aaron an offer he finds difficult to refuse.
With his pride standing in the way, can Aaron stay true to his principles, or will he, with reckless, passionate abandonment, succumb to Emma’s powers of persuasion?

Content Warning: contains explicit, sensual love scenes 


Excerpt 4...continued...

Chapter 2
When Mr. Aaron Trent left Bath that morning to call upon his cousin at Merton Manor, he had not expected to lodge overnight at The Stag and Hounds. During previous visits, he’d often used the inn as a watering hole, but had only once before, when a snowdrift had made it impossible for him to reach his cousin’s house, sought bed and board beneath Griffin’s roof.
That morning, Aaron had traveled to Newton Saint Loe, a small village near Corston, with the intention of calling upon his cousin, Lord Phillip Merton. However, upon reaching Merton Manor, Aaron had been greeted at the door by Carter, the butler, and informed his cousin wasn’t receiving visitors that day. Carter had been instructed to say his lordship was indisposed until further notice.
Ignoring this message, Aaron entered the manor, and shrugging off his caped greatcoat, he passed it to the butler, along with his beaver hat and kidskin gloves.
“There is no need to worry.” Aaron touched Carter reassuringly on the shoulder. “I shall see you are not dismissed for allowing me entry. But if you should be, you may call upon me at Windhurst Hall, and I shall find you a position. That is, if I still have a roof over my own head.”
Then, unceremoniously, and with angered haste, Aaron made his way up the grand staircase until he reached his lordship’s bedchamber.
Without a knock, he entered.
The room wreaked of stale smoke, alcohol, and the stench of…sex.
Beneath the curtained canopy of the four-poster bed and shrouded in rumpled, disheveled bedsheets were Lord Phillip Merton and an unknown woman. They were naked and lying entangled in one another’s arms.
Fleetingly, Aaron wondered how long his cousin and the young woman had been asleep. It was nearing mid-afternoon and they were still dead to the world. But with ruthless disregard for their slumberous condition, Aaron walked to the window, pulled back the heavy, velvet drapes, and flung the windows open wide, allowing the chilled air outside to invade the stiflingly hot, reeking room.
The woman was the first to stir. “Oh…lordy, lordy, lordy. I ain’t supposed to be found here. If Mrs. Hawkins should find me…”
She reached for the sheets, trying to cover herself and shield her body from Aaron’s scathing stare. From her accent and words, Aaron surmised that the wench was a house servant of sorts.
“I suggest you leave,” Aaron told her.
Scurrying to collect her scattered clothes, she hurriedly dressed and fled the bedchamber, slamming the door fiercely behind her before Lord Merton had an opportunity to stir.
“Phillip, wake up. Get out of bed, man.” When there was no response from his unconscious cousin, Aaron picked up a pitcher of water from the washstand and poured its contents uncaringly onto the dozing Phillip.
His lordship was instantly awake. Spluttering and shouting, he cursed until he eventually recognized Aaron as his abuser.
“Damnation, Aaron. I thought you were Carter. What in the world are you doing in my bedchamber? And why the sudden awakening?” Phillip put his hand to his brow, shielding his eyes from the bright sunlight as he turned the air blue with profanities. “I feel as if an axe is buried in my head. How much did I drink last night?”
Aaron shrugged his shoulders and returned the now empty pitcher to the washstand. “How the hell should I know? I was not here.”
Standing with his arms akimbo, Aaron assessed his cousin’s condition.
“Well, you ought to have been here,” said Phillip. “That scullery maid was more than accommodating, and I’m sure she could have found a suitable friend to satisfy your needs.”
Aaron gave a snort of disgust. “Your offer, although I’m sure kindly meant, would have been refused. I like my women willing, not coerced. Servants generally feel under an obligation to their masters, whereas courtesans, although more expensive, are less of a problem in the long run. Take my advice and stay away from the servants.”
Phillip scratched his head. “What are you doing at Merton Manor, and at this ungodly hour? As far as I knew, you were supposed to be somewhere on the south coast, recovering from war wounds. I was told it would take at least a year for you to fully recover. There were also rumors you would not make it at all―that you would die.”
“Is that why you spent most of my fortune and entailed my estate?”
Before enlisting and leaving England to fight Bonaparte in France, with the likelihood of not returning from the war, Aaron had signed a document stating that in the event of his death, his cousin was to be the sole beneficiary of the estate. During his absence, Phillip was also to act as trustee and executor of any business involving Windhurst Hall. Only the plan had backfired.
Returning to England, Aaron discovered the trust he had placed in his cousin had been abused. Having gained access to Aaron’s fortune, Phillip had squandered most of the holdings and had entailed Aaron’s home, Windhurst Hall, leaving Aaron with only a pittance upon which to live.
   
A Merchant’s Daughter
Copyright © 2019, Arabella Sheen
ISBN: 9781949300468
Publisher: Beachwalk Press, Inc.
Electronic Publication: August 2019
Editor: Pamela Tyner
Cover: Fantasia Frog Designs

eBooks are not transferable. No part of this book may be used or reproduced without written permission, except in the case of brief quotations in articles and reviews.

This book is a work of fiction and any resemblance to persons, living or dead, or places, events or locales is purely coincidental. The characters are productions of the author’s imagination and used fictitiously. 

About Arabella Sheen



Arabella Sheen is a British author of contemporary romance and likes nothing more than the challenge of starting a new novel with fresh ideas and inspiring characters.
One of the many things Arabella loves to do is to read. And when she’s not researching or writing about romance, she is either on her allotment sowing and planting with the seasons or she is curled on the sofa with a book, while pandering to the demands of her attention-seeking cat.
Having lived and worked in the Netherlands as a theatre nurse for nearly twenty years, she now lives in the south-west of England with her family.
Arabella hopes her readers have as much pleasure from her romance stories as she has in writing them.

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Arabella Sheen  http://arabellasheen.co.uk 

Wednesday, 26 February 2020

Welcome to Regency Author - Audrey Harrison


I’m delighted to welcome Audrey Harrison to my blog.

Audrey Harrison - Author

Hello Audrey – It’s lovely to have you on the blog, and I’m sure your Regency readers are looking forward to reading what you have to share with them today. But before we discover more about your latest Regency release, Lady Edith’s Lonely Heart, here are a few questions which will hopefully give your followers an insight into some of the things that matter to you.


Arabella: Authors can release books, making them available to readers in various ways…via an agent, or working directly with a traditional publisher, or they can even go the self-publishing route. Which method of publishing do you prefer, and why?
Audrey: For me it’s always been the self-publishing route. I’ve been told by publishing houses that there is no market for Regency Romance (!) My readers would suggest otherwise. Being self-published also gives me the opportunity to be in total control of every aspect of the publishing process – I admit to being a control freak! – and it helps me to connect to my readers and publish to my writing programme. I love the flexibility of it, that’s not to say it’s easy. It can be damned hard work, but I think the benefits outweigh the work needed.

Arabella: How do you research your Regency novels and characters?
Audrey: I have over 400 books at home which include diaries of Regency people, recipes, etiquette, and all forms of living in the Regency time. A lot more research is done than actually appears on the page, but I hope it helps my stories to be more authentic. Actually, the diaries are hilarious and can be quite rude! Life was a lot more risqué than appears in a lot of the Regency novels of today.





Arabella: Who or what inspired you to write your latest Regency release, Lady Edith’s Lonely Heart?
Audrey: I very often have an idea milling around in the back of my mind to start with. With Lady Edith’s Lonely Heart, it was that I found out The Times newspaper had been advertising Lonely Heart’s Ads since the 1600s. The moment I found that out at some point it was inevitable that I’d do a story around letters. I also love the films The Shop Around The Corner and You’ve Got Mail. I think the written word is a very romantic way to communicate.


Arabella: If the person of your dreams (husband/wife/partner/or Regency beau) were to invite you out, where would they take you, and which vehicle would they use:
1) Phaeton
2) Landau
3) Curricle
4) Barouche

Audrey: I don’t think I’d feel safe on a Phaeton! I had the opportunity of travelling around Stamford in a Landau as part of their Georgian Festival last year. It was quite cosy, very noisy and I loved every minute, so that would be my choice.

Landau Carriage
  
Arabella: Which is your most favourite period drama or historical film you’ve seen to date, and why is it so special?
Audrey: I’ve already mentioned The Shop Around The Corner (1940), but I suppose I’d have to say my absolute favourite is Alastair Sim’s A Christmas Carol/Scrooge (1953). Christmas is my favourite time of the year and I just love this version. It’s such a wonderful film of hope.

Arabella: When writing a book or chapter, which do you concentrate on first: plot, character, or setting?
Audrey: As I’ve mentioned with Lady Edith’s Lonely Heart, it was an idea which led to a plot. My two-part story about Foundlings, was written after a visit to The Foundling Hospital in London and Mr Bailey’s Lady developed from my own town’s industrial heritage. So I find that anchor and then develop the story around that.

Arabella: A slice of Chocolate Cake, a piece of Fruit, or Burger and Fries?
Audrey: A slice of cake, every time, but not chocolate cake I’m afraid. I love cake (which you can tell from my picture)



Cherry Cake Squares

Arabella: What advice would you give to someone who is starting out on their writing journey?
Audrey: Publishing has changed so much in recent years, it’s now accessible to us all. I think that’s amazing. I’ve done it and I’m from a very working-class background in the North of England (yes, I do have a funny accent!). I would urge everyone who has that overwhelming urge to write, to get their stories out there. Don’t write in secret, like I did for years. I’m overwhelmed that readers enjoy my books, but if I can do it, anyone can! 


Thank you for joining me on Arabella’s Blog and Chit-Chat, Audrey. Your latest release, Lady Edith’s Lonely Heart, sounds amazing.
I’m in awe of the fact you've ridden in a Landau Carriage. And if only I'd been in Stamford to see you riding on-high in all your Regency splendour...
All the best and wishing you lots more happy-ever-after Regency writing.
Arabella



About Audrey Harrison


Audrey Harrison - Author


AMAZON UK KINDLE STORYTELLER COMPETITION FINALIST 2018!

I was born about two hundred years too late.

In the real world I always longed to write, writing a full manuscript when I was fourteen years old. From the moment I could read I had my head stuck in a book. They were my prized possessions. Work, marriage and children got in the way as they do and it was only when an event at work landed me in hospital that I decided to take stock. One Voluntary Redundancy later, I found that the words and characters came to the forefront and the writing began in earnest.

So, although at home more these days, the housework is still neglected and meals are still late on the table, but I have an understanding husband. Most of the time!

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Book Blurb   Lady Edith’s Lonely Heart

A dashing tale of romance from a bestselling author of Regency Romance.

She is under pressure to find a husband she doesn't want.
He keeps to the fringes of society because of family constraints.
Will the written word be enough to bring two lost souls together?
Lady Edith Longdon is an heiress, in danger of being classed a spinster, and disillusioned with the fops, dandies, and fortune hunters surrounding her in society. Deciding it’s time to take her future into her own hands, she devises a foolproof way of finding someone she can love. She's convinced nothing could go wrong…
Lord Ralph Pensby, overwhelmed by a sense of obligation, and with no one he can turn to, is adrift from those around him…
Two people drawn together, both on a journey which will affect them in ways they could never have foreseen. Secret correspondence, mistrust and confusion, not to mention cads of the highest order, make this novel a fast-paced, heart-warming story, with appealing characters and a strong sense of time and place.

Perfect for lovers of all things Regency.


Friday, 21 February 2020

A Merchant's Daughter by Arabella Sheen EXCERPT 3



A Merchant’s Daughter

Arabella Sheen


A merchant’s daughter and a destitute nobleman. Can a marriage of convenience solve their problems?
Miss Emma Brentry is happy with life, but she feels the time has come to marry. Her father, a wealthy glass merchant, has expectations of grandchildren, and Emma doesn’t wish to disappoint him. Reluctantly, and somewhat halfheartedly, she begins the search for a husband.
Mr. Aaron Trent, a gentleman of noble birth, returns to England fresh from the Napoleonic war with a scar and limp to prove it. During his absence, his estate, Windhurst Hall, has been pledged by his cousin at the gaming tables. He is now in search of the necessary funds with which to buy back his home.
Traveling to Bath, Emma finds herself stranded on the road and is compelled to stay the night at The Stag and Hounds posting inn. She encounters Aaron, an attentive, handsome stranger, who offers her some much-needed assistance. Instant attraction is felt by both, and as dusk falls, Emma makes Aaron an offer he finds difficult to refuse.
With his pride standing in the way, can Aaron stay true to his principles, or will he, with reckless, passionate abandonment, succumb to Emma’s powers of persuasion?

Content Warning: contains explicit, sensual love scenes 


Excerpt 3...continued...


Emma felt flustered and out of her depth. Approached by a stranger, she had no idea how she ought to react. Should she be affronted, or should she simply ignore him? If he was prepared to assist, she decided that perhaps she ought to be civil in case she was compelled to accept his offer of help.
“My name is Emma Brentry, and I’m from Bath, sir.”
Emma stood and dropped a curtsy. She wasn’t used to introducing herself to strangers. Then again, neither was she used to frequenting posting inns.
“Miss Brentry.” The gentleman bowed. “Mr. Aaron Trent at your service. I was about to suggest I collect your belongings. My curricle is outside, and as I have yet to stable my grays, it will be no hardship to drive a mile or two and retrieve your luggage. Is that idea acceptable to you?”
The man before her was olive-skinned and unfashionably bronzed, as if he’d spent much of his time outdoors in the sun. He had a strong jawline and a straight nose that hinted of noble birth. For some unknown reason, Emma felt the immediate pull of his undeniable magnetism and was instantly attracted.
“The idea of you collecting my luggage is more than acceptable, sir. But might I be so bold to suggest I accompany you? You see, my father’s coachman, Gresham, is suspicious of most people we encounter, and he might not relinquish my belongings to you. I would also like to assure him that I am all right. He’s such a worrier, and as you and I are not known to one another…”
“I’m pleased to hear you have a coachman. To be honest, I was beginning to doubt your story. I could not envisage you driving a barouche or tackling the problems of a broken wheel alone. Certainly, you may ride with me. As for my credentials, here is my calling card.” Aaron’s hand delved into his pocket and emerged with a delicately engraved silver card case. He flipped the lid open and handed her a card. “Griffin will also vouch for me. Will you not, Griffin?”
“Course I will, Major Trent, sir. I’ve known you nigh on ten years or more. You’ve often stayed in Newton Saint Loe with your uncle, Lord Merton―God rest his soul. Merton Manor is just down the road. His lordship was always well-respected hereabouts. It’s a shame he passed away. And now that your cousin has―”
“Thank you, Griffin. I’m certain Miss Brentry has no need of my life history. If you could see your good wife prepares a room for her, and also somewhere for the coachman to sleep, we shall be indebted.”
“Yes, sir. I’ll ask Mrs. Griffin to see to it right away.”
Aaron placed his hand beneath Emma’s elbow, and he steered her carefully toward the door. As they stepped away from the inn and emerged into the bright sunlight and fresh air, she was made aware of exactly how dark and musky it had been inside. Taking a deep, cleansing breath, she turned to face Aaron.
Glancing briefly at his calling card, she read his details before placing it in her reticule for safekeeping. He seemed an honest enough person, and her instincts told her she could trust him.
“Well, Mr. Trent…what now, sir?” she asked.
Emma tilted her head to look up at Aaron. She estimated he was all of six-foot-two inches, and in the afternoon light, she could see that what she had thought to be dark brown curls were in fact jet-black locks. And then she noticed the rough, jagged line of a scar across his left cheek. It looked raw, fresh, and ugly.
As his eyes looked searchingly into hers, seeking her reaction to his injury, she only just managed not to turn her gaze away with unthinking revulsion. When inside the inn, she had not seen the scar, but perhaps that was because Aaron had intentionally kept his face averted in order to conceal the unsightly wound.
Emma looked across the cobbled yard and noticed an ivory-colored phaeton with two matching grays. It was standing near the water trough.
She hadn’t noticed the carriage earlier and surmised that the stagecoach, while waiting to depart, had blocked her view. It was a fine piece of equipment, and if she was of a sporting nature, which she wasn’t, she would be full of admiration for the elegance of the carriage and the thoroughbreds attached.
“Your carriage awaits, my lady. Shall we?”
As they walked toward the phaeton, Emma detected a slight limp in Aaron’s gait. At first, she’d thought the ivory cane he held was purely a fashionable accessory, as most dandies and coxcombs carried such a thing with them, but she’d been wrong. Aaron wasn’t using the cane for effect; he used it for support and as a walking aid.
Thinking it best not to comment on his disability, Emma remained silent. She didn’t want to offend. If she offered assistance, he might feel affronted.
Reaching the carriage, and without further ado, Aaron took her hand, and then, placing an arm around her waist, he assisted her onto the high seat of the phaeton. It felt strange having a man touch her. But there was no one to see. No one to chaperone, and no one to condemn their actions either. To Emma, it felt excitingly illicit. Being so free with a man and behaving in such a way was not her normal behavior.
Aaron walked around to the other side of the vehicle and joined her. They were perched on high, and to Emma, who had never previously ridden in such an excellent carriage, the ground seemed ominously far below.
She was unusually nervous. She was about to set off with a stranger and was aware that anything could happen.
The phaeton was light and well-sprung, and she’d been told by Harold, her sister’s husband, that to own such a carriage was extremely fashionable.
Emma leaned forward and smiled. “In case I forget, I must say how grateful I am for your thoughtfulness, and I do appreciate your kind offer. I have no idea how I am to repay you for your kindness, but I shall―”
Cutting her speech of thanks short, Aaron lifted the reins and asked, “Left or right?”
“Um…turn right, please. It is not far, and we should be there in―”
Her words were lost as, with a flick of the whip, the horses sprang forward and they were off at a spanking pace. 
  
A Merchant’s Daughter
Copyright © 2019, Arabella Sheen
ISBN: 9781949300468
Publisher: Beachwalk Press, Inc.
Electronic Publication: August 2019
Editor: Pamela Tyner
Cover: Fantasia Frog Designs

eBooks are not transferable. No part of this book may be used or reproduced without written permission, except in the case of brief quotations in articles and reviews.

This book is a work of fiction and any resemblance to persons, living or dead, or places, events or locales is purely coincidental. The characters are productions of the author’s imagination and used fictitiously. 

About Arabella Sheen



Arabella Sheen is a British author of contemporary romance and likes nothing more than the challenge of starting a new novel with fresh ideas and inspiring characters.
One of the many things Arabella loves to do is to read. And when she’s not researching or writing about romance, she is either on her allotment sowing and planting with the seasons or she is curled on the sofa with a book, while pandering to the demands of her attention-seeking cat.
Having lived and worked in the Netherlands as a theatre nurse for nearly twenty years, she now lives in the south-west of England with her family.
Arabella hopes her readers have as much pleasure from her romance stories as she has in writing them.

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And other reputable ebook retailers... https://books2read.com/u/3kpAog 

Arabella Sheen  http://arabellasheen.co.uk 

Wednesday, 19 February 2020

Welcome to Regency Romance Author - GL Robinson

I’m delighted to welcome Regency romance author GL Robinson to my blog.

GL Robinson

Hello Glynis – And thank you for joining me on Arabella’s Blog and Chit-Chat today. It was lovely to connect with you through the Romantic Novelists’ Association. I find the RNA to be a great group of authors and affiliate members with whom to share the writing journey. I’ve learnt so much from sharing with them, and hope you have too. But before we discover more about your latest release, ‘Cecilia or Too Tall to Love’, here are a few questions which will hopefully give your readers and followers and insight into some of the things that matter to you.


Arabella: How did you manage to get your first Regency novel published and what did you learn from the experience?
Glynis: I managed to get Imogen or Love and Money published when, like a 19th century explorer, I hacked through the impenetrable jungle that is Amazon! I had given up on the idea of traditional publishing when I realized it would take about a year for a book to come out. Since I’m 72 and have six books and counting, I thought I might be dead before I saw them all in print! Of course, it helped in the decision-making that I’d already been rejected by a couple of publishers!  


Arabella: If you could choose, which would it be: A walk in the woods, a walk along a beach front to dip your toes in the sea, or a day shopping for clothes?
Glynis: Ooh! Definitely a walk along the beach.  I come from Portsmouth, which is, of course, by the sea, and my boarding school was in Bournemouth – Boscombe, actually. It’s now the Royal College of Chiropracters! The nuns used to walk us two by two down the zig-zag cliff paths in our navy-blue uniforms. We’d change in one of those huts (not there any more) and swim as early as May in the freezing water.  We had those sagging wool swimming costumes some of your older readers might remember.  Attractive, they were not! I attribute my amazing good health to those bracing expeditions!  Nowadays, I live in the USA and spend the winter in Florida, so the beach is readily available, or would be, were it not for the appalling traffic. As for clothes, I’m 6ft tall and of a build that doesn’t accord with any sizing known to man, so clothes shopping is definitely not for me!




Arabella: Who or what inspired you to write your latest Regency release, Cecilia or Too Tall to Love?
Glynis: I already talked about going to boarding school. My younger sister was with me.  We used to read Georgette Heyer under the covers with a torch after lights out. Regency Romances have been a life-long passion, but I never even considered writing one, or anything. Then my dear sister died unexpectedly in 2018 and honestly, the day after her funeral, I sat up in bed and the first story came to me whole and entire. I wrote it in under a month. I’m sure it was she who inspired me, and continues to do so.  Writing has been integral to my grieving process and has seen me through it. I am publishing the second book, Cecilia or Too Tall to Love in February, and the third, Rosemary or Too Clever to Love, (discern a pattern?!) in May.

Arabella: Learning the special symbolism of flowers became a popular pastime in the 1800’s.
A Pink Rose symbolises: grace, happiness and gentleness, and a Forget-Me-Not symbolises: true love memories. Do you have a favourite flower, and does it hold a special symbolic mean or sentiment for you personally?
Glynis: I love flowers and have a garden in upstate New York where something is in bloom from April till November. The winters are too cold for anything to bloom. My birth month flower is the gladiolus, which I used to seriously dislike. I thought them boring.  But as I’ve got older, I’ve come to love them. They bloom all up the stem if you pick off the dead heads at the bottom.  That strikes me as amazingly resilient.  It’s as if they’re saying you think I’m done, well watch this! A good motto for an older woman! I also recently found out that if you give them to someone, it says that he or she pierces your heart with passion. Also a good motto for an older woman!


A View of Glynis's Floral Garden 

Arabella: Some authors write at first light, others need a mug of coffee or a glass of wine before putting pen to paper. When writing, are there any “essentials” you need to help the words flow?
Glynis: No, I can write anywhere, any time.  All I need is my keyboard and a bit of peace and quiet. I have arthritis in my fingers (thanks, Mum!) and never write longhand.  We always go to Florida on the car train and I tippy-tappy all the way down. I don’t plan my books in any real way.  I know where the story is going, more or less, but once my characters come to me, they tell me what I need to know.

Arabella: Are there any organizations, writing, or reader groups that you belong to?  And, how do they support or help you in creating your novels?

Glynis: I belong to the wonderful RNA and love the exchanges between authors on their FB sites. The questions that come up are the ones we all face: how to query, how to attract an agent or publisher, how to market, etc.  It’s a wonderfully supportive group. I also belong to two Book Groups, but, do you know, in over thirty years we’ve never discussed a Romance, until they were kind enough to choose my first novel. It’s so strange, as Romance (as a general category) is by far the best-selling category on Amazon.  I think people just assume Romances, and Regencies in particular, are all fluff and totally lack gravitas. We had a very interesting discussion of Imogen or Love and Money in my Book Group, so I decided to include Conversation Starters at the end of Cecilia or Too Tall to Love. I hope people enjoy using them!

Arabella: You’re halfway through the work-in-progress, you’re about to kill off the hero and there is going to be no happy-ever-after. In other words, you’re stuck! If you had to contact an “author/publisher/editor friend” for guidance, who would it be?
Glynis: I’d email my never-met-but-good-email-friend AudreyHarrison, accomplished and well-known writer of Regency Romances, fellow member of the RNA.  She has been a fount of wisdom and a patient explainer on my publishing journey.  I recently also e-met Val Portelli, another RNA member who’s been really kind. We’re hoping to collaborate on an Anthology.  Having said that, I’d NEVER kill off my hero!! Regencies don’t do that and anyway, I love them all too much! The odd fencing wound or gunshot, perhaps, from which the heroine lovingly nurses them back to full vigour!

Arabella: Your next Regency WIP (work in progress) is on schedule, and it’s time to take a break and relax. Which Jane Austen adaptation would you choose to watch (again J) ?
1) Persuasion
2) Pride and Prejudice
3) Northanger Abbey
4) Mansfield Park
Glynis: Definitely Pride & Prejudice, which I think I can quote practically line for line.  I love all of Jane Austen but I think P & P one of the finest books ever written.  The story arc, the characters, the precision of the language – absolutely wonderful.  I think the TV multi-episode adaptation was the best, particularly for the casting of Mr. Collins and Lady de Bourgh, who were absolutely perfect.


David Bamber as Mr. Collins

Barbara Leigh-Hunt as Lady Catherine de Bourgh

Arabella: Do you have any great writing, publishing, or marketing tips you’d like to share to “want-to-be” historical authors starting out on their writing journey?
Glynis: I’m so new on the journey myself I hesitate to give advice, but I would say that if you are an indie publisher you cannot have too many reviews of your book ready to be published the minute it goes up.  This is one time not be afraid of shameless self-promotion, so use all the groups, friends and contacts you have to ask people to preview your book. You can make it free for the first few days so they can get the book and give you a verified purchase review.  Another thing, don’t forget to put a note in your book, asking readers to give you a review. I didn’t do either of those things with my first book, thinking, probably as we all do, This is so good people will rush to read it! Nope!  It just ain’t so!


Thank you for joining me on Arabella’s Blog and Chit-Chat, Glynis.
The fact you were rejected by a few publishers when you first started out on your publishing journey…well, who hasn’t been? I think I can count on one hand the number of authors that have sailed through a book's publication without an agent’s or publisher’s rejection.
But I think what will take away with me from our ‘virtual’ Chit-Chat it that I’m so pleased you were able to tell us a little bit about your grieving process and how your sister has inspired you to write, and how writing has helped you to honour her memory. Thank you.
Good luck with your latest release, Cecilia or Too Tall to Love, and wishing you lots more happy-ever-after Regency writing.
Arabella Sheen


About GL Robinson

GL Robinson

I’m a product of a convent boarding school in the south of England in the 1950’s and early 60’s. You can probably guess I received an old-fashioned education. It actually could have been in the middle ages.  We used those desks with inkwells and it was only after a year or two that we started having ink pens with refillable cartridges. I learned a great deal about the humanities and practically nothing in the sciences. I understand Latin, speak French fluently and my German isn’t bad. I read the Canterbury Tales in the original Middle English when I was 16 and Shakespeare is an open book. But the only science I remember is the ditty: Miss Cummings (our teacher) was a scientist, alas she is no more, for what she took for H2O (water) was H2SO4 (sulphuric acid). Not bad, eh? Words to live by!
I met my American husband while working in Brussels and Bonn and had three children in a foreign tongue. I’ve lived in the USA for over 40 years and retired from my job as a French professor about six years ago. I have seven grandchildren and the same husband I started with.
I began writing Regency Romances 18 months ago after the death of my beloved sister who was in the convent with me all those years ago. We used to read them under the covers with a torch after lights out. My books are dedicated to her. You can see a pic of us together at Portsmouth Dockyard in the About Us section on my website: https://romancenovelsbyglrobinson.com/


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I don’t do Instagram yet, but soon, when I’ve recovered from the effort of the others.  Bear in mind I grew up in a house with no inside plumbing, let alone a phone or television!




BOOK BLURB:   Cecilia or Too Tall To Love

What does orphaned Cecilia Beaumaris, a too tall, too outspoken gentlewoman with no pretensions to beauty and no fortune, do when she is forced to leave the boarding school she has been living in for nearly fifteen years?  She decides to open her own school, of course. But she can’t touch her small inheritance until she is twenty-five, so she has to live temporarily with her aunt and uncle.  But they don’t want her.  To get her married off, they invent a fortune she doesn’t have and she’s besieged by fortune hunters. Enter Lord Thomas Allenby, a handsome, fashionable fribble, who has his own reasons for wanting to escape the marriage mart. He persuades her to announce a faux betrothal, but it doesn’t work out quite how Cecilia expects.

Against the background of early nineteenth century London, with its fashionable Mayfair mansions, East End slums and the development of public education, this is the story of how one woman seeks to improve the lives of impoverished girls by opening a school for them.  The effect on her own life is beyond her wildest imaginings.


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Blinded by Desire - Arabella Sheen - EXCERPT 6

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