Friday, 27 March 2020

Westbury by Arabella Sheen - EXCERPT 4





Westbury

A Traditional Regency Romance

Arabella Sheen


Can Miss Georgina Morton surrender her independence and accept the Duke’s love?

Miss Georgina Morton, at the age of four-and-twenty, with a modest annual income of four hundred pounds, believes she has no need of a husband and can manage quite nicely without one. Yet within a matter of weeks, she’s betrothed to Giles Glentworth, the Sixth Duke of Westbury, and bound for Regency London.
Set in rural Wiltshire and elegant, fast-paced London...a runaway ward, a shooting at midnight, and a visit to fashionable Almack’s, are only a few of the adventures Georgina enjoys while falling for the Corinthian charms of the Duke.


Chapter One     Excerpt 4    continued…

Tempted to stamp her foot in frustration, but being of a calm and level-headed disposition, Georgina knew such an outburst of emotion would achieve nothing productive.
“Georgina, I think you’re unnecessarily fearful.” said Mr Morton. “The child must have some sense. Some intelligence. And she has seen you’re a trustworthy individual, has she not? But on the matter of keeping her here, even though we might not wish for her to wander the countryside alone, we cannot force her to stay with us, my love.” Mr Morton looked at his daughter over the rim of his spectacles. “If we did, we might be accused of kidnapping, or at best, holding her against her will. She must be free to continue on her travels if she so wishes and to face the perils of them, if that is the case.”
“Then in all good consciousness, we must persuade her otherwise,” said Georgina. “For I cannot allow this to happen.”
“You cannot stop it from happening. You’re not her keeper.”
“But Papa, I cannot turn a stray dog away from the door and certainly not this poor child. With your permission, Abigail must remain here with us until I find a solution. Perhaps if we are able to discover the whereabouts of her relatives, her troubles might be solved.”
“Go and fetch this poor child and let me see for myself how things stand, for I fear you’re too emotional. I expect your judgement is clouded and all this runaway needs is a good talking to. Perhaps we can persuade her to return to her family.”
“I think not,” said Georgina. “Although Abigail is terrified about what is to become of her, I believe she is brave enough to find her way to London as she originally intended. My only wish is that she might do so safely.”
Georgina stood and walked to the door. She turned and said, “Papa, I will go and find her. And please be kind, for I know how intimidating you can be. Sometimes you only have to look at me over your papers and you have me quaking in my shoes.”
Abigail was no longer to be found in the parlour.
Concerned and suspecting the worst, Georgina went in search of her, but luckily Abigail hadn’t left. She was to be found in the kitchen sat at the table with Betty, the housekeeper, and with Nelson, their cat, on her lap.
The warm, inviting kitchen was filled with the delicious smell of freshly baked bread. Betty had been baking, and two large loaves were cooling on the table.
An array of sparkling brass pots and pans were on a dresser along with copper jelly moulds and jugs. A kettle hung over the black cast-iron hearth in which a fire was burning. Steam came from the kettle’s spout, and Betty had the makings of a pot of tea at the ready.
Abigail looked up from stroking Nelson. “Oh, Georgina, I hope you don’t mind, but Nelson came into the parlour, and when he left, I followed him to the kitchen. Isn’t he gorgeous? And he’s so fluffy.” Heedless of the cat hairs that were being shed on her clothes, Abigail continued to stroke him. “Betty said she would bring me tea in the parlour, but I much preferred waiting for you here.”
“I’ve come to take you to see Papa,” Georgina said. “I’ve explained most of what you’ve told me, but he would like to see for himself what sort of person you are. Shall we go to him now? In ten minutes Betty can bring tea and some of her delicious caraway-seed cake. Or would you perhaps prefer some sandwiches?”
“Oh, no. Cake is fine. And yes, I would love to meet your father.”
When Georgina managed to distract Abigail away from Nelson, they went to the library where Mr Morton had remained. Georgina knocked before entering. He was still sat in his high-back armchair.
“Papa, this is Abigail. The young person I told you about. She’s hoping to stay with us―for a little while.”
“Indeed?” said Mr Morton.
Abigail dropped a curtsy.
“Yes, sir. And thank you for allowing me to stay in your home. It’s so kind of you.”
“Nothing has been decided, young lady. I don’t know enough about your circumstances to understand if it warrants you staying with us. Would you care to explain what has happened?”
“Oh, Papa. I’ve already told you what has happened, and―”
Mr Morton held up his hand, and Georgina fell silent.
“Let the young lady speak, Georgina. I prefer to hear the story from the source.” Mr Morton looked long and hard in Abigail’s direction. He eyed her from top to toe and made an assessment. Like Georgina, he too came to the decision she was of good family and ought not to have been allowed to venture abroad. But he was determined to get to the bottom of the problem and find out exactly what was going on. “What brought about your departure from Bath, and why did you leave the safety of your home?”
“It wasn’t my home, sir. And the reason I left so suddenly is because I urgently need to reach my Great Aunt, in London. Only…that dreadful coachman cast me off and now I’m stranded in Avebury.”
Mr Morton reached down to a wicker-basket beside his chair; he lifted a log and threw it onto the fire. The log knocked against others burning in the hearth, and sparks danced into life.
He’d had time to think.
“We must write to your Great Aunt, and we must do so at once.” he said. “Your Great Aunt can send someone to collect you.”
Abigail’s eyes widened with fear.
“Oh, no! I must tell you that I do not wish to be collected. I would not wish for my Great Aunt to be so troubled.” Abigail sighed despondently. “Mr Morton…sir…can you not lend me the money to pay my fare? I promise it will be returned as quickly as possible.”
“I won’t lend money,” Mr Morton said. There was a frown on his brow. “Not because I think it will not be returned, but because the same might happen to you again. You could become stranded. Left by the roadside and in a worse position than you are now. Perhaps next time someone of a similar character as that of my daughter will not be on hand to save you.”
“Can Abigail stay, Papa? Please? At least for a little while. Perhaps in a few days she will be more inclined to contact her relatives and seek help. Is that not so, Abigail?”
Abigail nodded. “Yes...perhaps. Maybe in a few days.”
“Surely there can be no harm in her staying with us?” Georgina asked.
Mr Morton raised a brow, sceptically.
“I should imagine her family will be worried, concerned and fretful,” Mr Morton said. “Georgina, if you were to run from home, I certainly would be troubled.”
“Oh, no, Mr Morton. No one will worry about me,” said Abigail with a smile. “Truly.”
“Papa…?” Georgina looked expectantly at her father.
Mr Morton, knowing of his daughter’s determined nature, and realising it might take a few days to uncover all Abigail’s secrets, eventually nodded his consent.
And Georgina was happy. Their guest was to remain.


Disclaimer, Copyrights and Publishing
Any names or characters have no existence outside the imagination of the
author or are used fictitiously, and actual events are purely coincidental.
No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, copied,
stored in a retrieval system known or hereinafter invented, without
written permission of the publisher.


Copyright © 2019 by – Arabella Sheen
Published by priceplacebooks

All rights reserved.
ISBN 978-0-9575698-4-3


About Arabella Sheen

Arabella Sheen

Arabella Sheen is a British author of contemporary romance and likes nothing more than the challenge of starting a new novel with fresh ideas and inspiring characters.
One of the many things Arabella loves to do is to read. And when she’s not researching or writing about romance, she is either on her allotment sowing and planting with the seasons or she is curled on the sofa with a book, while pandering to the demands of her attention-seeking cat.
Having lived and worked in the Netherlands as a theatre nurse for nearly twenty years, she now lives in the south-west of England with her family.
Arabella hopes her readers have as much pleasure from her romance stories as she has in writing them.

Social Media






BUY LINKS: 
Amazon – Nook – Kobo – Smashwords – Apple – etc.: https://books2read.com/u/mla2xB

Wednesday, 25 March 2020

Welcome to Regency Author - Jayne Bamber


I’m delighted to welcome Regency author Jayne Bamber to my blog.

Jayne Bamber - Author

Hello Jayne – It was lovely to connect with you through the Regency Readers and Writers group on Facebook, and I was so pleased you were able to fill a spot on Arabella’s Blog and Chit-Chat this week. But before we discover more about your latest release, Strong Objections to the Lady, here are a few questions which will hopefully give your readers and followers an insight into some of the things that matter to you.


Arabella: Are there any organisations, writing, or reader groups, you belong to? And, how do they support or help you in creating such wonderful, inspirational novels?
Jayne: I do participate in a lot of Jane Austen related groups on social media. It’s a great fandom, and there are many groups dedicated to JAFF specifically. Sometimes I just get a laugh out of some great Austen memes, but it’s also a wonderful way to engage with other readers about Austen’s novels and characters. It’s tremendously helpful in writing fan-fiction, to be able to start discussions on Facebook about characters and events from the original books, and let that feedback actually help shape my ideas as they take form.


Arabella: Where do you read? Sofa or bed or ____?
Jayne: Well - when I’m indoors, bed, always bed! However, I am fortunate enough to live among some really beautiful scenery out in the Piney Woods of Texas, so I spend a lot of my day outdoors finding comfy, sunny spots for reading and writing.




Arabella: In your latest Regency release, Strong Objections to the Lady, who is your favourite character and why?
Jayne: Hands down, Anne de Bourgh! She was an absolute blast to write, because Jane Austen gave us just enough of a glimpse at her to want to know more, and as a writer the possibilities were endless for me. I decided to develop her as brash, romantic, and kind of a loose cannon - think Catherine Morland meets Lydia Bennet. It’s a take I had not seen done before in fanfiction, and though the story focuses on romances for Elizabeth and Jane Bennet as well, I got to unleash Anne de Bourgh’s high energy and unrepentant youthfulness on the cast of characters to wreak some havoc.


Arabella: When writing a novel, how do you work? Are you a plotter or pantser?
Jayne: I always start out as a plotter, with a meticulously detailed outline, but I inevitably do some pantsing as I go, especially toward the end.


Arabella: It’s your day off. The WIP (work-in-progress) is going to plan and you’re free to do what you like. Which would you prefer to do?
1) Spend a morning in the grounds of a stately home or historical building?
2) Find the nearest library and sit in a quiet corner with a research book? 
3) Scour the local antique shops and flea markets looking for Regency bargains?

Jayne: Wow, all of these sound pretty tempting! While number 1 is a strong contender, I think I would have to choose option 2, and lurk with a book! I have been enjoying some pretty niche historical reads lately, which might develop into future projects someday.

Research Library

Arabella: We all have a long list of books we keep meaning to read but never have the time for --- which book is a must read for you this season?
Jayne: This is not a new-release, but something I started and then had to put aside when I started my WIP. I read about a quarter of The Summer Queen by Elizabeth Chadwick and I was absolutely engrossed. Not only is the story of Eleanor of Acquintane fascinating, but the writing style was so unique and wonderful, I really cannot wait to pick it back up again after I finish my current WIP.


Arabella: Which historical locations, cities or buildings have given inspiration when writing your Regency novel(s)?
Jayne: Definitely the great houses in England that have been used in film adaptations of Austen. I’m trying to conceptualize Norland right now, and it doesn’t get much time in Sense & Sensibility, but my vision for it is pretty grand. I am looking at Petworth House, Ashton Court, and Donington Hall right now.

Ashton Court Estate
  
Arabella: What about your future plans? Any books or series in the making?
Jayne: I have a list of books to someday write, and I think that list grows longer, faster than I can keep up! I have a couple more Pride & Prejudice variations I would like to do soon, but at the end of the year I am planning a series of stand-alone regency novellas that are all cross-overs of Emma with other Austen novels. Emma’s matchmaking skills unleashed on the characters from across Austen is going to be a lot of fun!


Thank you for joining me on Arabella’s Blog and Chit-Chat, Jayne. It was great to learn about some of your writing secrets and discover your insatiable passion for JAFF (Jane Austen Fan Fiction) and Pride & Prejudice variations.
Now here is a bit of a shocker…
You mentioned Ashton Court. I once worked within the catering team at the beautiful historic building known as Ashton Court. The Smyth family’s home had been converted to an entertainment venue, and weddings and large gatherings such as university graduate parties were held there. Alas, this has now ceased to happen due to lack of funding…but the famous Bristol Balloon Festivals still continues in the extensive estate grounds.
I also feel privileged in that I can enjoy looking at the historic building with its surrounding majestic trees and grounds from "our" kitchen window. This gives me much pleasure, especially on a sunny morning.

All the best for your release - Strong Objections to the Lady – and happy Regency writing…
Arabella




About Jayne Bamber

Jayne Bamber - Author

Social Media Links:



Book Blurb - Strong Objections to the Lady



A tale of…
Intrigue & Inheritance… Meddling & Manipulation… Sisterhood & Self-Improvement...

When Lady Catherine de Bourgh learns of Mr. Darcy’s proposal to Elizabeth Bennet, her wrath sets in motion a series of events at Hunsford Parsonage which embroil Darcy and Elizabeth in a family fracas that grows more complicated daily.
The shades of Rosings Park are soon polluted by the shocking transformation of its new mistress and her guests, as well as secrets of the past and schemes for the future.
Appearances and alliances shift amidst the chaos wrought by a well-intentioned house party, and Darcy and Elizabeth must finally face their feelings for one another despite mounting obstacles and misunderstandings of every kind.

***

Set chiefly in Kent and spanning the short space of just a month, this stand-alone variation begins the morning after Mr. Darcy's failed proposal at Hunsford. From there, chaos quickly erupts and the lives of three strong young women tangle together in a day-by-day journey of growth, sisterhood, and ultimately romance, in the wake of tragedy.

BUY LINKS:




Friday, 20 March 2020

Westbury by Arabella Sheen - EXCERPT 3




Westbury

A Traditional Regency Romance

Arabella Sheen


Can Miss Georgina Morton surrender her independence and accept the Duke’s love?

Miss Georgina Morton, at the age of four-and-twenty, with a modest annual income of four hundred pounds, believes she has no need of a husband and can manage quite nicely without one. Yet within a matter of weeks, she’s betrothed to Giles Glentworth, the Sixth Duke of Westbury, and bound for Regency London.
Set in rural Wiltshire and elegant, fast-paced London...a runaway ward, a shooting at midnight, and a visit to fashionable Almack’s, are only a few of the adventures Georgina enjoys while falling for the Corinthian charms of the Duke.



Chapter One    Excerpt 3   continued…

Georgina gave a sympathetic smile. “I understand you thought it safer to travel these roads as a man, but my concern is that you were permitted to leave your home at all.”
“Oh, no! I wasn’t allowed to leave, exactly. I’ve been staying with a cousin, and I’ve...I’ve sort of run away.”
“Oh dear,” gasped Georgina, astonished. She’d discovered the situation was far worse than she first supposed. “If that’s the case, I think it best we hurry to Rose Hill, so we can be comfortably seated, and you can tell me all I need to know. Don’t you agree, Miss…?”
Georgina waited, hoping she would be rewarded with a name.
“Please, call me Abigail. But I beg you not to ask the name of my family because I know you will feel obliged to contact them and inform them of my whereabouts. And yes, I’d like to go to Rose Hill with you, for you seem like a person I can trust.”
With the decision made to journey on to Rose Hill, they walked over to The Red Lion and entered. Speaking briefly with the landlord, they asked if he could spare a stable boy to help take Abigail’s travelling bags to the house. When everything was arranged to their satisfaction, and they knew that Ned, one of the stable hands, was to deliver the bags, they set off at a steady pace.
Georgina wasn’t exactly dressed for a long trek.
That morning, she’d left the house hurriedly with Mr Kelley, a friend of her father’s. Mr Kelley had been visiting her Papa, and upon discovering Georgina intended to call upon the vicarage with a basket of eggs, he’d offered a ride in his gig as far as the village. Georgina had readily accepted his offer and without thinking about her return journey, or the fact she might need a sturdier pair of shoes, she’d set off wearing house slippers and not her robust, sensible nankeen half boots.
With her bonnet tied securely upon her head, and wearing a plain beige pelisse over her muslin morning dress, she looked exactly what she was―a refined young lady dressed in a sensible style.
Georgina was practical in outlook. Clothes were to be worn because they were of use, not because they were the height of fashion. And although she would sometimes love the luxury of dressing solely for elegance and not functionality, she was realistic enough to know that, in the country, away from the bustle and trends of the city, comfort and durability were the deciding factors when choosing what to wear.
Spring would soon be here, and today, with a fresh nip still in the air, Georgina was thankful for the warmth and protection her old pelisse was giving.
Crossing the brown, freshly ploughed fields in which crows and ravens were diving for offerings, Georgina and Abigail soon arrived at the tall wrought-iron gates of Rose Hill House.
For most of her four-and-twenty years, Georgina had lived at Rose Hill House with her parents. But since the death of her mother, whom she still sorely missed, it was only Georgina and her father who lived there.
The house was an impressive dwelling.
Although not overly grand and not at all pretentious, it was a modest sturdy stone structure, set in mature, well-manicured gardens. Positioned on the south side of the house was the coach house and stables.
The gardens wrapped neatly around the wisteria-clad walls. And with a lavish green lawn extending down a steep incline until it reached the edge of a twisty, meandering brook, it was indeed a strikingly beautiful place in which to live.
Behind some woodland to the rear of the property was a small expanse of hidden acreage. It was an area Georgina was allowed to keep aside for her horse Splendour to use. There were also a couple of fields in which her father’s farmhands worked, keeping the estate in sufficient crops and vegetables, throughout the year.
Walking to the house and entering through the impressive solid-wood door, Georgina discarded her bonnet, pelisse, and the basket she’d been carrying, carelessly onto a chair before showing Abigail into a parlour.
The sun streamed in through the open French windows, and although it was a spacious room, it felt cosy. In the centre, was a large, pink rug upon which stood a circular table and matching chairs. A fire screen was before the hearth, and above the mantel was a framed portrait of Georgina’s mother.
Pointing to a chair, Georgina said, “Please, take a seat, I shall not be long. I will go and find my father and explain the situation.”
Georgina thought it best if she spoke with her father before ordering tea for Abigail. She wasn’t reluctant to introduce them to one another; it was just that she thought it best if she paved the way. Her father was set in his ways and disliked his routine to be disturbed. And an unexpected guest would definitely be a disturbance.
Georgina found her father closeted in the library where he was accustomed to sit and relax. The day wasn’t cold, but a comforting fire had been lit, and the room had warmth to it.
Mr Morton was a well-built man of sturdy frame and posture. He had strong features and there was a black ribbon tying his dark brown hair back from his face. It could be said that he was not dissimilar to Georgina in looks, but he’d nothing of her soft femininity. He was ageing but not old, and today he was to be found sprawled in his favourite armchair, reading.
Entering the room, Georgina waited for her father to finish reading the page he was on. And when he placed a finger, wedging it between the closed pages of the book, marking the spot he’d reached, she began to explain about Abigail’s predicament.
She had his full attention.
Enlightening him on Abigail’s unexpected eviction from the stagecoach, she then began the daunting task of persuading her father to allow Abigail to remain. She insisted it was to be only until Abigail was reunited with her family, or if not her family, then until someone was found to take on the responsibility of Abigail’s wellbeing.
Georgina walked to a chaise lounge placed near Mr Morton’s chair and sat down, clasping her hands firmly in her lap.
“So, you see, Papa, we cannot permit this poor child to continue on her journey. It would not be safe for her. She is an innocent, and we don’t know what might befall her if she were to travel on to London―alone. She has no concept of danger, and she is willing to place her trust in anyone who comes along. Look how she blindly trusted me! I feel it my duty to offer some sort of protection and guidance to someone so young. Is it not vexing, to be in a position where we are unable to do anything to help?”


Disclaimer, Copyrights and Publishing
Any names or characters have no existence outside the imagination of the
author or are used fictitiously, and actual events are purely coincidental.
No part of this publication may be reproduced, transmitted, copied,
stored in a retrieval system known or hereinafter invented, without
written permission of the publisher.


Copyright © 2019 by – Arabella Sheen
Published by priceplacebooks

All rights reserved.
ISBN 978-0-9575698-4-3


About Arabella Sheen

Arabella Sheen

Arabella Sheen is a British author of contemporary romance and likes nothing more than the challenge of starting a new novel with fresh ideas and inspiring characters.
One of the many things Arabella loves to do is to read. And when she’s not researching or writing about romance, she is either on her allotment sowing and planting with the seasons or she is curled on the sofa with a book, while pandering to the demands of her attention-seeking cat.
Having lived and worked in the Netherlands as a theatre nurse for nearly twenty years, she now lives in the south-west of England with her family.
Arabella hopes her readers have as much pleasure from her romance stories as she has in writing them.

Social Media




BUY LINKS: 
Amazon – Nook – Kobo – Smashwords – Apple – etc.: https://books2read.com/u/mla2xB

Wednesday, 18 March 2020

Welcome to Regency Author - Beth Elliott


I’m delighted to welcome Beth Elliott to my blog.

Beth Elliott - Author

Hello Beth – I’ve been looking forward to hosting you on Arabella’s Blog and Chit-Chat, and I’m eager to learn some of your writing secrets. But before we discover more about your Regency book, The Outcasts, that you are releasing later this year, here are a few questions which will hopefully give your readers and followers an insight into some of the things that matter to you.


Beth: Hello Arabella, and thank you for inviting me to chat on your Blog today.

Arabella: Authors can release books, making them available to readers in various ways…via an agent, or working directly with a traditional publisher, or they can even go the self-publishing route. Which method of publishing do you prefer, and why?
Beth: So far I’ve been happy to work directly with traditional publishers. I received lots of good advice and help from my first publisher. The covers for my stories were bright and inviting as well. Now we communicate by email, I find it reassuring to be able to settle any questions quickly. I prefer not to handle the technical side but probably will venture into self-publishing one day, and see how it works for me.


Arabella: A slice of Chocolate Cake, a piece of Fruit, or Burger and Fries?
Beth: I’m not very fond of chocolate, and I’ve cooked too many burgers and fries to want more. Any fruit – especially apricots and raspberries – would always be a treat.

The Outcasts

Arabella: Who or what inspired you to write your soon to be published Regency novel, The Outcasts?
Beth: The Outcasts is the story of Joachim, the youngest brother in the Montailhac family. He’s too busy running the family estate to spare any time for his mother’s guest, a young lady so withdrawn he calls her Miss Dismal to himself. But both of them helping after a tragic accident at the local mine reveals another side to Nell’s character. Little by little, respect leads to friendship and love, only for them to be torn apart. It seems impossible for them to meet again, but love always finds a way.
[This story will be published later this year.]


Arabella: If the person of your dreams (husband/wife/partner/or Regency beau) were to invite you out, where would they take you, and which vehicle would they use:
1) Phaeton
2) Landau
3) Curricle
4) Barouche

Beth: I’d want to be driven from my smart lodging on Marine Parade to Brighton Racecourse in a curricle, by a Corinthian, probably Sir Waldo Hawkridge or else by my own Arnaut de Montailhac, who handles the ribbons to perfection and who has irresistible charm.

A Curricle

Arabella: Which is your most favourite period drama or historical film you’ve seen to date, and why is it so special?
Beth: The 1995 Pride and Prejudice is still top of my list. I can believe in this Elizabeth and Darcy and never tire of watching how they go from the initial hostility to falling so deeply in love - *sigh* - that smouldering exchange of looks across the drawing room at Pemberley. No wonder he galloped off to propose the next morning. Also, it’s one of the rare films that follows the whole book, so there’s no disappointment at any cuts or rejigging of the plot.


Pride and Prejudice - 1995

If you could meet someone from Regency author - Georgette Heyer’s novels, which character would it be and what would you say to them?
Beth: Rose petals, pink champagne, his own yacht, a love of travel and adventure, and a kind heart – it HAS to be Lord Damerel. I’d say that I’d appreciate his advice on making a tour of Italy and Albania... and hold my breath for an invitation to cruise the Adriatic with him.


Arabella: When writing a book or chapter, which do you concentrate on first: plot, character, or setting?
Beth: A mix of all three. I always try to make the setting visually clear but my main focus is the character and what and why s/he’s doing this at this point and what emotion is involved.


Arabella: How do you research your Regency novels and characters?
Beth: All my stories start when a photo of a person suddenly surges towards me off the page I happen to be looking at. It could be from a magazine, a fashion catalogue or an online article and it can happen any time. Immediately I see scenes of their life but have no idea in what order these take place. Once I’ve collected a group of characters, they show me what they want to do, where they live and what their relationship is to each other. My research then begins with actual events of the year in which the story needs to take place, followed by the settings involved. This usually requires a visit. So whether it’s Bath, Brighton, Istanbul or the French Pyrenees, off I go to get the details as accurate as possible. I’m often incredibly lucky and get a private tour round the place I want to use. At this charming 17th-century royal pavilion in Istanbul, for instance,



or this 18th-century chateau in the French Pyrenees.


I’d also like to mention Hartwell House, where the staff were so helpful and had tales of the time the French king, Louis XVIII and his wife lived there. In addition to field visits [including one to Troy for Scandalous Lady], I have lots of reference books and of course, sources like Jane Austen’s novels.


Even so, the characters manipulate me horribly! One story ended up needing Huguenots, smallpox, silversmithing and a frigate journey, together with spies, horses and prehistoric caverns [also visited! Gulp]. I really was banging my head on the desk before everything in that tale was properly researched. And as if that were not enough, I also like to put real people in a story, but only in a minor role.


Arabella: What advice would you give to someone who is starting out on their writing journey?
Beth: It’s easy to write those first few pages, and maybe up to two or three chapters. But then realisation dawns that the task is a big one. I’d reassure them that every writer has times when they feel what they’ve written is rubbish. Never throw anything away, just give it some time. Rewriting is always possible and improves the text.
Be determined to complete the story and keep on writing regularly, in the time slot available. It was Colin Dexter who said, ‘Write a page a day and you’ll have a novel in a year.’ I find that excellent advice.


Thank you for joining me on Arabella’s Blog and Chit-Chat, Beth. It sounds as if you’ve had some amazing book researching experiences. And if you ever need to explore prehistoric caverns again, Cheddar Gorge and Wookey Hole caves in Somerset, England are excellent places to visit.
All the best for your soon to be re-published books and The Outcasts, and wishing you a lot more Regency romance writing.
Oh…and your shout-out about Colin Dexter’s advice is spot on. A page a day...and a book will soon be written.
Best wishes, 
Arabella



About Beth Elliott

Beth Elliott - Author

Books have always been an essential part of my life. As soon as I could read for myself, books were the door to many other worlds. Often, though, they ended too soon, so I’d make up extra chapters to complete the story to my satisfaction. Any tale of long ago and far away appealed, but once I read Pride and Prejudice, the Regency world became my favourite place. It’s no wonder my own stories are set in that elegant but dangerous era.
My Regency Tales offer an escape from the everyday world; a place to go for some adventure, intrigue and romance, together with the certainty of a happy ending – at least for the main characters. That eliminates any anxiety about the final outcome.  It’s the journey to get there that provides suspense and enjoyment. For me, both as reader and writer, the more impossible the initial problems facing my characters, the more fun in the story.
For more information, visit Beth at the following links.


Joffe Books [ www.joffebooks.com ] are publishing new editions of my first two Regency Tales very soon. These stories are linked as the heroes are friends, involved in undercover work for the Duke of Wellington. At the end of The Wild Card, Greg had to go back to the army with a broken heart. Two years later, like a knight of old, he sets out to rescue a damsel in distress. The trouble is she refuses to be rescued.

Details will be on my website.

The Wild Card takes place in London in 1810.
Blurb
Kitty Towers is a reluctant debutante, determined to avoid marriage. However, she is drawn to enigmatic Theo Weston, despite his rakish behaviour at their first encounter.
On the other hand, another suitor, Etienne de Saint-Aubin, is equally appealing. Kitty soon realises that one of them is a spy. As the plot thickens, only Kitty can save the day, but at almost fatal cost to herself.

In All Honour set in Bath in 1812.  
Blurb
Sarah Davenport’s brother has gambled away his entire fortune. Lord Percival implies he will accept Sarah in lieu of the debt. Major Greg Thatcham's family apparently also owes money to Lord Percival. When Greg seeks help from Sarah, attraction flares between them. But, in all honour, he is the one man she can never marry. Then Lord Percival kidnaps her. Can Greg find her before tragedy strikes again?

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